Nostalgia Lane: Wolfenstein 3-D

I was dubious. “So… it’s a game where you go from room to room and shoot people? Doesn’t sound that great to me.”

“Just you wait until you play it,” my friend James assured me.

It was after church in the fall of 1992, and I was hanging out with my twin friends at their house. While we didn’t always have a lot in common (they were sports nuts, me a sci-fi geek), video games were where we could always agree. They had just attained a shareware copy of some game called Wolfenstein 3-D, and although I didn’t know it then, I was about to enter the world of first-person shooters.

Using the shareware model — where the first episode of a game was released for free and you would pay for (or pirate) the remaining episodes — id’s Wolfenstein 3-D exploded among the gaming population. It used an older 2-D property that was mostly about stealthing around Nazi castles and turned it into a rip-roaring action fest.

Despite the name, Wolfenstein 3-D wasn’t 3-D at all, but a pseudo 3-D (2.5-D) that used a lot of visual trickery to convince you that you were moving around in a 3-D environment. There was no jumping, no aiming up or down, and not an awful lot of weapon variety — but it was a blast.

I think it had to do with the whole Nazi angle. You start out as a prisoner of war who kills his guard, takes his knife, and begins a rampage through several German fortresses. Each level had tons to explore, with locked doors, secret passages/rooms, treasure to pick up, and lots of unsympathetic mobs to mow down.

wolf3Weapon-wise, there was the default knife, the pistol, the submachine gun, and the minigun. Everything other than the knife used the same pool of ammo, so if one wasn’t careful, you’d run out of bullets with the minigun and be stuck stabbing guards at point-blank range.

There were so many small details about Wolfenstein that made it endearing:

  • Being attacked by German shepherds was actually scary, even though they were weak
  • The guards barking out simple German phrases (“achtung!” forever became a part of my vocabulary)
  • The thrill of running along a wall slamming on the space bar and eventually finding a secret room bursting with treasure
  • How id would taunt you with the different difficulty level descriptions
  • BJ’s face becoming bloodier the more hurt you became

But really, for me it was about getting into the zone of rushing through levels, taking out Nazis, and becoming good about staying alive. Like any classic video game, there was that moment of zen-like gaming where you’re just playing on a whole different level.

Wolfenstein 3-D probably became the most notorious for its depiction of Hitler wearing a mechanical battle suit and shooting rockets, which is why most kids from the early 90s have a horrible grasp on history. Still… I can’t deny that it felt really satisfying to take him down in a red puddly mess.

Doom’s arrival on the scene quickly made Wolf a game of the past, but for me it’ll always have a special spot as a new experience and an introduction into 3-D gaming.

8 thoughts on “Nostalgia Lane: Wolfenstein 3-D

  1. tsuhelm February 25, 2015 / 9:20 am

    I’d seen Wolfenstein 3D while at uni but didn’t get hands on…BIG MISS, it wasn’t until I could play DOOM that I got into FPS in which that space button mashing for secret doors continued especially to find the visible but seemingly unaccessible goodies. I can quite clearly see the opening level of DOOM in my head… secret doors all memorized!

  2. Tyler F.M. Edwards February 25, 2015 / 11:27 am

    Ah, Nazis. They’re like zombies in that no matter how many digitized versions of them you slaughter, it never gets old. And you don’t have to feel bad about it, because they’re Nazis/zombies.

    I’m surprised there aren’t more zombie Nazi games…

    Anyway, Wolfenstien 3-D was one of my very first gaming experiences. I hardly remember it now, but it will always have a fond place in my heart.

  3. ironweakness February 25, 2015 / 12:49 pm

    Hitler was not a

  4. ironweakness February 25, 2015 / 12:52 pm

    Hitler was not a mech suit wearing video game boss with rocket launchers. Everyone knows he used occultic dark arts to try and summon denizens of hell in order to win the war. People are so gullible sometimes.

  5. soulboundlife February 25, 2015 / 5:24 pm

    Shareware! I miss those days.

    Doom was my first FPS experience, and I remember downloading a 1v1 training program to practice strafe-shooting. Fun times!

  6. baldwinp February 26, 2015 / 8:54 am

    Loved playing this and scorched earth on our high school computers. Such appreciated irony.

  7. Syp February 26, 2015 / 10:49 am

    Oh man, Scorched Earth! So great!

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